114th Congress: Supporting Law Enforcement and Crime Victims

Senator John Cornyn
2016-12-21 15:35:32
The Lonestar Weekly The Lonestar Weekly About For Texans Issues Newsroom Contact 114th Congress: Supporting Law Enforcement and Crime Victims As the 114th Congress comes to a close, we can look back on several major pieces of legislation that were enacted to empower victims of crime and support law enforcement. Congress passed bills to expand active shooter training for law enforcement, increase resources to identify mentally ill offenders, reduce the nationwide rape kit backlog, and strengthen resources for law enforcement to arrest human traffickers. Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015 (Passed Senate 4/22/15, passed House 5/19/15, became law 5/29/15) Strengthens law enforcement tools to help authorities rescue victims and take down human traffickers and the organized criminal networks who support them. Provides victims of sexual exploitation, slavery, and human trafficking with resources to heal and restore their lives. Targets predators who purchase trafficked women and encourages partnerships at the federal, state and local level. POLICE Act of 2016 (Passed Senate 5/18/16, passed House 7/12/16, became law 7/22/16) Expands access to existing federal funding for law enforcement and first responders to receive active shooter response training. Endorsed by the National Fraternal Order of Police, the National District Attorneys Association, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the Major County Sheriffs Association, and the Sergeants Benevolent Association. Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Passed Senate 6/16/16, passed House 11/29/16, became law 12/16/16) Gives our law enforcement the resources to arrest violent offenders and reauthorizes grant funding for local and state law enforcement to help reduce the nationwide rape kit backlog. Provides resources for forensic labs while protecting the innocent by improving access to post-conviction DNA testing. Strengthens crime victims' rights in the courtroom, increases access to restitution and restorative services like housing, and reauthorizes important law enforcement investigative programs. Survivors' Bill of Rights Act (Passed House 9/6/16, passed Senate 9/28/16, became law 10/7/16) Ensures sexual assault survivors in federal criminal cases are notified before an evidence collection kit is destroyed, can request preservation of the kit, and are informed of important results. Requires the Attorney General and the United States Department of Health and Human Services to convene a joint working group on best practices regarding the care and treatment of sexual assault survivors. Major Provisions of the Mental Health and Safe Communities Act (Passed as part of the 21st Century Cures Act and became law 12/13/16) Allows law enforcement to use existing funding to create pre-trial screening and assessment programs to identify mentally ill offenders, provide need-based treatment, and develop post-release supervision plans, including judicially-administered Assisted Outpatient Treatment programs. Uses federal grant funding to expand the use of Crisis Intervention Teams, who are trained to respond to mental health crises and prevent acts of violence. Enables existing federal funding to be used to provide treatment, mentoring, and other transitional services to mentally-ill offenders leaving custody. By providing law enforcement with the training to prevent violent crimes and the resources necessary to put criminals behind bars, we can help keep our communities safe and restore the lives of victims across the nation. In this way Congress was able to work in a bipartisan way to benefit the most vulnerable in our society. 517 Hart Senate Office Bldg. Washington, DC 20510 Main: 202-224-2934 Fax: 202-228-2856 Get Assistance This message was intended for: xxx You were added to the system October 8, 2015. For more information please follow the URL below: newsletter.senate.gov/p/islD8ERugN Follow the URL below to update your preferences or opt-out: newsletter.senate.gov/p/oslD8ERugN To unsubscribe from future mailings, send an email to mailto:xxx?Subject=Unsubscribe&body=Please%20remove%20me%20from%20further%20mailings with "Unsubscribe" as the subject line.

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114th Congress: Supporting Law Enforcement and Crime Victims

As the 114th Congress comes to a close, we can look back on several major pieces of legislation that were enacted to empower victims of crime and support law enforcement. Congress passed bills to expand active shooter training for law enforcement, increase resources to identify mentally ill offenders, reduce the nationwide rape kit backlog, and strengthen resources for law enforcement to arrest human traffickers.

Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015 (Passed Senate 4/22/15, passed House 5/19/15, became law 5/29/15)

  • Strengthens law enforcement tools to help authorities rescue victims and take down human traffickers and the organized criminal networks who support them.
  • Provides victims of sexual exploitation, slavery, and human trafficking with resources to heal and restore their lives.
  • Targets predators who purchase trafficked women and encourages partnerships at the federal, state and local level.

POLICE Act of 2016 (Passed Senate 5/18/16, passed House 7/12/16, became law 7/22/16)

  • Expands access to existing federal funding for law enforcement and first responders to receive active shooter response training.
  • Endorsed by the National Fraternal Order of Police, the National District Attorneys Association, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the Major County Sheriffs Association, and the Sergeants Benevolent Association.

Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Passed Senate 6/16/16, passed House 11/29/16, became law 12/16/16)

  • Gives our law enforcement the resources to arrest violent offenders and reauthorizes grant funding for local and state law enforcement to help reduce the nationwide rape kit backlog.
  • Provides resources for forensic labs while protecting the innocent by improving access to post-conviction DNA testing.
  • Strengthens crime victims’ rights in the courtroom, increases access to restitution and restorative services like housing, and reauthorizes important law enforcement investigative programs.

Survivors’ Bill of Rights Act (Passed House 9/6/16, passed Senate 9/28/16, became law 10/7/16)

  • Ensures sexual assault survivors in federal criminal cases are notified before an evidence collection kit is destroyed, can request preservation of the kit, and are informed of important results.
  • Requires the Attorney General and the United States Department of Health and Human Services to convene a joint working group on best practices regarding the care and treatment of sexual assault survivors.

Major Provisions of the Mental Health and Safe Communities Act (Passed as part of the 21st Century Cures Act and became law 12/13/16)

  • Allows law enforcement to use existing funding to create pre-trial screening and assessment programs to identify mentally ill offenders, provide need-based treatment, and develop post-release supervision plans, including judicially-administered Assisted Outpatient Treatment programs.
  • Uses federal grant funding to expand the use of Crisis Intervention Teams, who are trained to respond to mental health crises and prevent acts of violence.
  • Enables existing federal funding to be used to provide treatment, mentoring, and other transitional services to mentally-ill offenders leaving custody.

By providing law enforcement with the training to prevent violent crimes and the resources necessary to put criminals behind bars, we can help keep our communities safe and restore the lives of victims across the nation. In this way Congress was able to work in a bipartisan way to benefit the most vulnerable in our society.

 

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