Rolling Back Red Tape

Congressman Bob Goodlatte
2017-02-10 21:33:17
Click here to open this e-mail in its own browser window <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/view_newsletter_setup.aspx link=VA06BG%2501173674%2501115.1%2bFeb10%2bENews%250114286.4732900.29160 25.7665219%2501goodlatte%2540unityfeed.com%2501Friend%2501goodlatte%2540 unityfeed.com%2501%2501> Click here to open a plain text version of this email <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/view_newsletter_setup.aspx plain_text=Y&link=VA06BG%2501173674%2501115.1%2bFeb10%2bENews%250114286. 4732900.2916025.7665219%2501goodlatte%2540unityfeed.com%2501Friend%2501g oodlatte%2540unityfeed.com%2501%2501> <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/iqClickTrk.aspx &crop=14286.4732900.2916025.7665219&report_id=&redirect=http%3a%2f%2fgoo dlatte.house.gov%2f&redir_log=698444897491189> House Clears Email Privacy Act <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/Customers/VA06BG/Email.png> <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/Customers/VA06BG/EmailPriva cyAct.jpg> A lot has changed since 1986, when the current law governing law enforcement's access to electronic communications was enacted. Mail was sent with a postage stamp, a search engine was called a library, "tweets" were the sounds made by birds, and "clouds" were found only in the sky. Technology has far-outpaced that 1986 law. The U.S. Constitution protects Americans' property from unreasonable searches and seizures and we must ensure that this principle continues to thrive in the digital age. The Email Privacy Act passed by the House this week <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/iqClickTrk.aspx &crop=14286.4732900.2916025.7665219&report_id=&redirect=https%3a%2f%2fww w.youtube.com%2fwatch%3fv%3dYy4uqp6XfPM&redir_log=127077188506297> modernizes this decades-old law to establish a uniform warrant requirement to acquire stored electronic communications in criminal investigations. These updates to the law will better safeguard Americans' constitutional rights while also protecting law enforcement's ability to fight crime. The House overwhelmingly approved this bill, and it's time for the Senate to take up this bipartisan legislation and send it to the President's desk to become law. Serving on the House Agriculture Committee <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/Customers/VA06BG/Tractor.pn g> <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/Customers/VA06BG/AG.jpg> Farming has never been an easy way of life, but a strong agriculture industry and rural America is essential to our economy, national security, health, and prosperity. In Virginia, the agriculture industry plays a particularly important role as the largest contributor to our economy. I am honored to continue serving on the House Agriculture Committee in the 115th Congress. Over the years, I've had the opportunity to meet individuals from nearly every aspect of agriculture and hear how federal policies coming out of Washington directly impact their livelihoods. As lawmakers, we must ensure that American agriculture can continue to meet the needs of our nation and prevent federal red tape that would make it impossible for farmers to continue producing abundant and affordable food and fiber products. In the coming months, the Agriculture Committee will have the responsibility of crafting a new Farm Bill, which sets our nation's policy on issues ranging from managing commodities, crop insurance, rural development, forest management, conservation, nutrition, and food safety. If you have comments about what this legislation should look like, please feel free to contact me <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/iqClickTrk.aspx &crop=14286.4732900.2916025.7665219&report_id=&redirect=http%3a%2f%2fgoo dlatte.house.gov%2fcontact&redir_log=284812509717243> . Agriculture is not just a part of our heritage as a nation; it also plays an essential role in the future of America. Rolling Back Red Tape Most people wouldn't read the Federal Register on a daily basis � it's not exactly light reading. But each business day, the Federal Register, kind of like a daily newspaper for the bureaucracy, is published with new federal agency regulations, executive orders, and proclamations. The 2016 edition of the Federal Register clocked in at 97,110 new pages for the year, longer by 16,000 pages than 2008's edition of 80,700 pages. This growth in new rules and regulations from government agencies is precisely why the House of Representatives is advancing a two-part plan to cut through the influx of red tape coming out of federal agencies in recent years. In the opening days of the 115th Congress, the House of Representatives passed three bills to reform the way federal rules and regulations are made going forward and ensure bureaucrats are held accountable to the American people. Now, Congress is using a tool called the Congressional Review Act, or CRA, to roll back some of the most egregious rules released in the final days of the Obama Administration. The CRA has been around since 1996 when it was signed into law by President Clinton. It creates a streamlined process to roll back a federal rule without the threat of a Senate filibuster. By using this tool, Congress can look back at rules finalized in the last 60 legislative days and introduce a "resolution of disapproval" to repeal the rule in its entirety. In order to bypass the Senate's arcane rules and slow process, these resolutions only need to pass by a majority vote in both the House and Senate before being sent to the President's desk for signature. In just the last couple of weeks, the House of Representatives has passed a series of eight resolutions using the CRA to strike costly, overreaching rules from the books. One of these is the flawed Stream Protection Rule, which would annihilate America's coal industry and threaten thousands of good paying jobs. This resolution has already passed in the Senate and is on its way to the White House to become law. Another is a Social Security Administration rule that would lead to many law abiding Americans losing their Second Amendment rights. The House also voted to repeal the Department of Education's new rules that undermine state and local control over education. Using the CRA to stop these rules is a good use of legislative tools provided to Congress. The way Washington makes regulations must change so that smarter, more efficient regulations become the norm, not the exception. Click here for my full weekly column. <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/iqClickTrk.aspx &crop=14286.4732900.2916025.7665219&report_id=&redirect=http%3a%2f%2fgoo dlatte.house.gov%2fnews%2fdocumentsingle.aspx%3fDocumentID%3d810&redir_l og=074169778286455> Announcing Sweet Briar College's 13th President <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/Customers/VA06BG/IMG_2729.J PG> On Monday, I was honored to attend the announcement of Sweet Briar College's new president, Meredith Woo. She is an experienced leader and will work hard to continue to see the College grow. I'm happy to welcome her to the Sixth District, and I wish Dr. Woo the best. <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/iqClickTrk.aspx &crop=14286.4732900.2916025.7665219&report_id=&redirect=https%3a%2f%2fww w.facebook.com%2fBobGoodlatte&redir_log=515773899343261> <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/iqClickTrk.aspx &crop=14286.4732900.2916025.7665219&report_id=&redirect=https%3a%2f%2fww w.youtube.com%2fuser%2fRepBobGoodlatte&redir_log=257105601647312> <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/iqClickTrk.aspx &crop=14286.4732900.2916025.7665219&report_id=&redirect=https%3a%2f%2ftw itter.com%2frepgoodlatte&redir_log=886825838975231> <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/iqClickTrk.aspx &crop=14286.4732900.2916025.7665219&report_id=&redirect=https%3a%2f%2fww w.instagram.com%2fbobgoodlatte&redir_log=980768550318272> www.goodlatte.house.gov <iqconnect.lmhostediq.com/iqextranet/iqClickTrk.aspx &crop=14286.4732900.2916025.7665219&report_id=&redirect=http%3a%2f%2fwww goodlatte.house.gov&redir_log=884852880078214> This message was generated from an unattended mailbox. 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House Clears Email Privacy Act

A lot has changed since 1986, when the current law governing law enforcement’s access to electronic communications was enacted. Mail was sent with a postage stamp, a search engine was called a library, “tweets” were the sounds made by birds, and “clouds” were found only in the sky.

Technology has far-outpaced that 1986 law. The U.S. Constitution protects Americans’ property from unreasonable searches and seizures and we must ensure that this principle continues to thrive in the digital age. The Email Privacy Act  modernizes this decades-old law to establish a uniform warrant requirement to acquire stored electronic communications in criminal investigations. These updates to the law will better safeguard Americans’ constitutional rights while also protecting law enforcement’s ability to fight crime. The House overwhelmingly approved this bill, and it’s time for the Senate to take up this bipartisan legislation and send it to the President’s desk to become law.

Serving on the House Agriculture Committee

Farming has never been an easy way of life, but a strong agriculture industry and rural America is essential to our economy, national security, health, and prosperity. In Virginia, the agriculture industry plays a particularly important role as the largest contributor to our economy.

I am honored to continue serving on the House Agriculture Committee in the 115th Congress. Over the years, I’ve had the opportunity to meet individuals from nearly every aspect of agriculture and hear how federal policies coming out of Washington directly impact their livelihoods. As lawmakers, we must ensure that American agriculture can continue to meet the needs of our nation and prevent federal red tape that would make it impossible for farmers to continue producing abundant and affordable food and fiber products.

In the coming months, the Agriculture Committee will have the responsibility of crafting a new Farm Bill, which sets our nation’s policy on issues ranging from managing commodities, crop insurance, rural development, forest management, conservation, nutrition, and food safety. If you have comments about what this legislation should look like, . Agriculture is not just a part of our heritage as a nation; it also plays an essential role in the future of America.

Rolling Back Red Tape

Most people wouldn’t read the Federal Register on a daily basis – it’s not exactly light reading. But each business day, the Federal Register, kind of like a daily newspaper for the bureaucracy, is published with new federal agency regulations, executive orders, and proclamations. The 2016 edition of the Federal Register clocked in at 97,110 new pages for the year, longer by 16,000 pages than 2008’s edition of 80,700 pages. This growth in new rules and regulations from government agencies is precisely why the House of Representatives is advancing a two-part plan to cut through the influx of red tape coming out of federal agencies in recent years.

In the opening days of the 115th Congress, the House of Representatives passed three bills to reform the way federal rules and regulations are made going forward and ensure bureaucrats are held accountable to the American people. Now, Congress is using a tool called the Congressional Review Act, or CRA, to roll back some of the most egregious rules released in the final days of the Obama Administration. The CRA has been around since 1996 when it was signed into law by President Clinton. It creates a streamlined process to roll back a federal rule without the threat of a Senate filibuster. By using this tool, Congress can look back at rules finalized in the last 60 legislative days and introduce a “resolution of disapproval” to repeal the rule in its entirety. In order to bypass the Senate’s arcane rules and slow process, these resolutions only need to pass by a majority vote in both the House and Senate before being sent to the President’s desk for signature.

In just the last couple of weeks, the House of Representatives has passed a series of eight resolutions using the CRA to strike costly, overreaching rules from the books. One of these is the flawed Stream Protection Rule, which would annihilate America’s coal industry and threaten thousands of good paying jobs. This resolution has already passed in the Senate and is on its way to the White House to become law. Another is a Social Security Administration rule that would lead to many law abiding Americans losing their Second Amendment rights. The House also voted to repeal the Department of Education’s new rules that undermine state and local control over education.

Using the CRA to stop these rules is a good use of legislative tools provided to Congress. The way Washington makes regulations must change so that smarter, more efficient regulations become the norm, not the exception.

Announcing Sweet Briar College's 13th President

On Monday, I was honored to attend the announcement of Sweet Briar College's new president, Meredith Woo. She is an experienced leader and will work hard to continue to see the College grow. I'm happy to welcome her to the Sixth District, and I wish Dr. Woo the best.

 

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Should you have further questions, please visit the "
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