We won't get fooled again.

Senator Orrin Hatch
2017-04-21 19:04:36
Dear Friend,  In the parting shot of his presidency, President Barack Obama defied the entire Utah congressional delegation and the will of his own constituents when he declared the Bears Ears area a national monument. With the stroke of a pen, he locked away an astonishing 1.35 million acres of land—a geographic area larger than the total acreage of all five of Utah’s national parks combined. Without a doubt, Bears Ears was the most egregious example of executive abuse I’ve seen in my lifetime. That’s why I’ve been fighting tooth and nail to clean up the monumental mess left behind by the reckless and overreaching Obama administration.   (Video Via Facebook) In my first meeting with President Trump in the Oval Office, we discussed the public lands issue at length. He listened intently as I relayed the fears and frustrations of thousands in our state who have been personally hurt by the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase monument designations. Our president assured me that he stands ready to work with us to undo the damage wrought by previous administrations. My ultimate goal is to return control of these lands to those who know it best: the men and women of southern Utah. To that end, I traveled to San Juan County on Thursday to meet with the very people President Obama ignored in making his midnight monument designation. I spoke with tribal leaders, small business owners, and county commissioners in an effort to find a grassroots alternative to the Bears Ears debacle. I believe we can protect these lands without killing small businesses and without ignoring the needs of our local communities. You can read more about this in an op-ed I wrote in the Deseret News this morning, titled "Working with the President to fix monumental messes."  In the months to come, I look forward to working with the Trump administration to fix this disaster. We will win in the fight for local control.   Sincerely,   Orrin 

Dear Friend, 

In the parting shot of his presidency, President Barack Obama defied the entire Utah congressional delegation and the will of his own constituents when he declared the Bears Ears area a national monument. With the stroke of a pen, he locked away an astonishing 1.35 million acres of land—a geographic area larger than the total acreage of all five of Utah’s national parks  combined.

Without a doubt, Bears Ears was the most egregious example of executive abuse I’ve seen in my lifetime. That’s why I’ve been fighting tooth and nail to clean up the monumental mess left behind by the reckless and overreaching Obama administration.

 

(Video Via Facebook)

In my first meeting with President Trump in the Oval Office, we discussed the public lands issue at length. He listened intently as I relayed the fears and frustrations of thousands in our state who have been personally hurt by the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase monument designations. Our president assured me that he stands ready to work with us to undo the damage wrought by previous administrations.

My ultimate goal is to return control of these lands to those who know it best: the men and women of southern Utah. To that end, I traveled to San Juan County on Thursday to meet with the very people President Obama ignored in making his midnight monument designation. I spoke with tribal leaders, small business owners, and county commissioners in an effort to find a grassroots alternative to the Bears Ears debacle. I believe we can protect these lands without killing small businesses and without ignoring the needs of our local communities. You can read more about this in an op-ed I wrote in the Deseret News this morning, titled "Working with the President to fix monumental messes." 

In the months to come, I look forward to working with the Trump administration to fix this disaster. We  will win in the fight for local control.  

Sincerely,

 

Orrin 

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Senator Orrin Hatch
104 Hart Office Building Washington, DC 20510
Phone: (202) 224-5251
Fax: (202) 224-6331