Retain highly educated workers

Congressman Jim Matheson
2012-12-04 12:09:54
If you are having trouble viewing this E-newsletter, please visit [matheson.congressnewsletter.net/mail/util.cfm for the Web Version. Congressman Jim Matheson, 2nd Congressional District of Utah Dear Friend, Utah�s economic growth and encouraging jobs outlook is due, in part, to expansion of the technology industry along the Wasatch Front. Names such as eBay, Omniture, Oracle and Microsoft are among the 7,000 high-tech, life science and clean technology companies that operate facilities here. Many of the business leaders I meet with stress the importance of a skilled, well-educated workforce, including college graduates with advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering or math (STEM). Innovators want and need to hire the best and the brightest, including those immigrants who came to the U.S. to study and earn their academic degrees and would remain here to work but for a dysfunctional federal immigration system. There has long been bipartisan support for an expedited process to grant legal status to immigrant students holding advanced degrees. Despite general agreement on the need to increase the number of visas available, until now there has been no agreement on how to make that happen. I supported legislation passed by the House� (H.R.� 6429) �that creates a new STEM visa program. Foreign students who earn advanced degrees in these areas from U.S. colleges and universities could remain here to work in those fields.� The bill provides 55,000 visas by eliminating an existing but inadequate program and reallocating its currently allotted visas. �Employers wishing to fill a job position with a STEM visa candidate would submit a job order to their state labor department. We want the smartest people in the world to study and work in the U.S.� Our companies compete more effectively in the global economy.� As always, I�m interested in your opinion.� Please reply to the short survey below. Sincerely, [image = matheson.congressnewsletter.net/images/user_images/JM_signature.gif] U.S. Representative 2nd District of Utah How well is Utah doing to prepare for high-tech jobs?[survey] Tell a Friend* Survey/Question [survey] [image = matheson.congressnewsletter.net/common/images/sn-digg.gif]Share on Digg [image = matheson.congressnewsletter.net/common/images/sn-facebook.png]Share on Facebook [image = matheson.congressnewsletter.net/common/images/sn-linkedin.png]Share on LinkedIn [image = matheson.congressnewsletter.net/common/images/sn-twitter.png]Share on Twitter [image = matheson.congressnewsletter.net/common/images/sn-gplus.png]
December 04, 2012

Dear Friend,

Utah’s economic growth and encouraging jobs outlook is due, in part, to expansion of the technology industry along the Wasatch Front. Names such as eBay, Omniture, Oracle and Microsoft are among the 7,000 high-tech, life science and clean technology companies that operate facilities here. Many of the business leaders I meet with stress the importance of a skilled, well-educated workforce, including college graduates with advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering or math (STEM).

Innovators want and need to hire the best and the brightest, including those immigrants who came to the U.S. to study and earn their academic degrees and would remain here to work but for a dysfunctional federal immigration system. There has long been bipartisan support for an expedited process to grant legal status to immigrant students holding advanced degrees. Despite general agreement on the need to increase the number of visas available, until now there has been no agreement on how to make that happen.

I supported legislation passed by the House  (H.R.  6429)  that creates a new STEM visa program. Foreign students who earn advanced degrees in these areas from U.S. colleges and universities could remain here to work in those fields.  The bill provides 55,000 visas by eliminating an existing but inadequate program and reallocating its currently allotted visas.  Employers wishing to fill a job position with a STEM visa candidate would submit a job order to their state labor department.

We want the smartest people in the world to study and work in the U.S.  Our companies compete more effectively in the global economy.  As always, I’m interested in your opinion.  Please reply to the short survey below.


Sincerely,

U.S. Representative
2nd District of Utah

How well is Utah doing to prepare for high-tech jobs?

*By answering this survey, you are subscribing to my newsletter

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