The Mike Drop - Sen. Crapo's Update from Washington

Senator Mike Crapo
2017-10-11 19:48:54
United States Senator Mike Crapo - Idaho id="content_main"> [image = crapo.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/MikeDropLogo_2.jpg] id="content_main"> **Dropping In This Issue** - Crapo Convenes Hearing on Equifax Data Breach - Crapo Leads Discussion with Agriculture Secretary to Fix Wildfire Funding - Sanctions on North Korea Reviewed in Banking Committee - Idaho U.S. Attorney Clears Senate Confirmation - Op-Ed Series: Tax Reform for all Americans - From the Photo Album - What I've Been Reading id="content_main"> *WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2017* The past several weeks have been busy in Washington, with hearings on critical issues including North Korea sanctions and oversight of the recent Equifax data breech. In this edition of the Mike Drop, I highlight some of the work I have been involved with in recent weeks. You are receiving this email because you may have signed up to receive communications from me via my website, or perhaps at one of my town meetings. If you would like to keep receiving these periodic updates, you do not need to take any action. If you would like to unsubscribe, you can do so using the links at the end of this message. As always, you are welcome to email me through my website, crapo.senate.gov, under the 'contact me' tab at the top of the page. Dropping in this issue . . . **CRAPO CONVENES HEARING ON EQUIFAX DATA BREACH; INFORMATION FOR IDAHO CONSUMERS** Equifax, one of the country's three largest credit reporting agencies, disclosed that more than 145 million people had their names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses, and in some cases driver's license numbers compromised in a massive data breach. As Chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, which has oversight of the credit bureaus, I called in former Equifax Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Richard Smith to get answers to some of our many questions, such as why it took Equifax six weeks to disclose the breach publicly, why executives were trading during that time, what kind of cybersecurity measures the company employs and how the company intends to minimize harm to consumers and make them whole. You can watch the full hearing with Richard Smith by clicking on the image below. The hearing begins at the 18:00 minute mark. [image = crapo.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/Crapo_Equifax.jpg] [link 1] *Sen. Crapo questions former Equifax CEO Richard Smith* Cybersecurity is one of the most pressing issues facing companies, consumers and governments alike, and is one of the biggest threats to our financial system. The amount of data that the private industry and the government collect and store is very concerning. Collecting such massive amounts of personal financial information creates an intrinsic vulnerability. Congress will be having meaningful discussions about how to protect and limit access to it. While those discussions are ongoing, Idahoans should take every precaution to secure their data and protect themselves in the wake of a breach. First, you should find out if your information has been compromised by visiting the Equifax website. If you have been affected, you can sign up for a fraud alert through Equifax. Equifax has also announced free credit freezes through January, as well as a free lifetime service that will allow customers to lock and unlock their credit files. I encourage you to explore these options to determine whether they are right for you, and continue to monitor your credit reports and bank accounts for any unusual activity in the meantime. I also encourage you to take proactive steps toward protecting your privacy. The Federal Trade Commission offers helpful tips on how to safeguard your personal information. General advice includes knowing who you share information with; storing and disposing of your personal information securely, especially your Social Security number; asking questions before deciding to share your personal information; and maintaining appropriate security on your computers and other electronic devices. In this digital age, it is almost virtually impossible to prevent entities from collecting and storing massive amounts of personal, private information. We have seen that no one is immune when it comes to cyberattacks, and we all need to take the necessary steps to prioritize cybersecurity and resiliency. Equifax is just the latest in a series of massive data breaches at major companies, demonstrating that more needs to be done to ensure customer information is protected. Private and public entities must prioritize maintaining strong safeguards to protect any and all personally identifiable information of U.S. consumers. Both must be held accountable for protecting and limiting access to that information. **CRAPO LEADS DISCUSSIONS WITH AGRICULTURE SECRETARY TO FIX WILDFIRE FUNDING** On September 26, I joined a bipartisan group of western senators in meeting with U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue to push legislation I am co-sponsoring with Senator Ron Wyden (D-Oregon) to fix a practice known as "fire borrowing." During the meeting, it was clear from both the Secretary and fire experts from the U.S. Forest Service that Congress should pass our bill to end fire borrowing. The bill, known as the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act, would treat wildfires as natural disasters and stop the depletion of the Forest Service's budget by reforming the way the federal government funds wildfires. The legislation would end "fire borrowing" by allowing agencies to fund any fire fighting and suppression spending needed through disaster funding just as other agencies do for tornadoes, hurricanes and floods. It would also make room for wildfires in the disaster budget so other natural disasters would not have to "compete" for disaster funds. Making disaster funding available after the fire suppression funding is spent would allow the Forest Service to use its fire prevention funding for its intended purpose--completing hazardous fuels reduction projects that have been shown to help break the cycle of increasingly dangerous and costly fires. It would also prevent the Forest Service from exhausting its budget, which is needed for other projects such as forest restoration, habitat programs, trail maintenance and fire prevention programs, such as thinning. During our breifing, the Forest Service announced **all-time record spending of more than $2 billion to pay to fight this year's wildfires**, which have destroyed significant parts of the West. These fires have, once again, forced federal agencies to empty non-fire accounts of more than a half-billion dollars to pay for wildfires. More than 8.5 million acres have burned across the country this year--a 47 percent increase from the 10-year average of 5.8 million acres, according to the U.S. Forest Service. The emergency preparedness levels for fire are at the highest point in five years. We already know in the West about the devastation of these wildfires on our habitat, our lungs, and on our heritage. Hopefully, now our colleagues in the Senate will see the magnitude and immediacy of this problem and end this "fire borrowing" so that we can focus on fire prevention and saving lives, habitats and our favorite public lands for the future. You can see my exhcnage with Secretary Perdue by clicking on the image below. [image = crapo.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/2017Sept-CrapoPerdue.jpg] [link 2] *Click the image for video of Sen. Crapo's exchange with Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue.* [image = crapo.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/2017Sept-RischCrapoPerde.jpg] *Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue (at podium), is joined by Sens. Crapo, Risch, Wyden (D-Oregon) and Bennet (D-Colorado)* **NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REVIEW BEFORE COMMITTEE CHAIRED BY CRAPO** Many Idahoans have seen the recent news regarding North Korea's aggressive pursuit of nuclear weapons. North Korea has continued to draw international rebuke for its firing a missile over Japan, and for conducting another test of a nuclear device, this one possibly being an atmospheric test of a type of hydrogen bomb. These actions only serve to suggest that if North Korea were to become a nuclear-armed state, it would present an existential threat to at least several of its Asian neighbors, while posing a great danger to American citizens. Our President has been working to stop further proliferation by increasing the economic pressure on those who do business with the North Korean regime. One way to apply such pressure is through the use of sanctions. Several weeks ago, the committee heard from a panel of sanctions scholars and professionals who agreed that economic and diplomatic pressure must be maintained against North Korea. In a more recent hearing before the Senate Banking Committee, we heard from Administration officials who spoke about the actions taken by the Administration to deploy maximum pressure against North Korea. Our witnesses from the Treasury and State Departments discussed increased sanctions enforcement, as well as efforts to encourage multilateral enforcement of sanctions. The committee also assessed what additional sanctions, if any, the U.S. should impose in light of North Korea's continued missile testing and advancing nuclear weapons capability. The Banking Committee has received several pieces of legislation that would impose even stronger sanctions against North Korea and those who facilitate its pursuit of nuclear weapons. I am committed to working closely with my colleagues to carefully assess the options available to the Banking Committee to enhance pressure on North Korea. You can view the hearing in its entirety by clicking on the image below. Note that the video has quite a lengthy delay so to watch it, I recommend advancing the video to the 15 minute mark to begin. [image = crapo.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/Sept2017_NK_Sanctions_Hearing.JPG] [link 3] **IDAHO STATE SENATOR BART DAVIS CONFIRMED BY U.S. SENATE TO BE U.S. ATTORNEY FOR IDAHO** Recently, the nomination of Idaho State Senator Bart Davis to serve as Idaho's next United States Attorney was confirmed by the full United States Senate. As a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, which was responsible for overseeing this nomination, I worked with the rest of my Senate colleagues to move his nomination to the full Senate. Bart Davis is a dedicated public servant who will ensure all Idahoans receive equal justice under the law. I congratulate Senator Davis on his confirmation to be Idaho's next United States Attorney. Before his confirmation, Davis has represented the 33rd District in the Idaho State Senate for the past 19 years, including as Majority Leader for 15 years. In addition to his service in the Idaho State Senate, Senator Davis is currently in private practice in Idaho Falls, Idaho, where he focuses on commercial, regulatory and transactional work. He is currently a commissioner to the Uniform Law Commission and a past chairman of The Council of State Governments. He is a graduate of Brigham Young University and the University of Idaho College of Law. *IN CONGRESS NOW: TAX REFORM FOR ALL AMERICANS** The Senate and House, in conjunction with the President, have been discussing a framework to reform our outdated, overly-complex tax code. It has been 30 years since the last major revision of our tax code. Its complexity is hindering the ability of our economy to grow, small businesses to expand and thrive and, perhaps most importantly, American families to keep more of what they earn. To do tax reform right, we must go beyond the simple traditional tax cut debate and instead comprehensively address each of these problems within the tax code. Beginning in a series of opinion pieces this month, I outline some of the reasons why our tax code must be reformed [link 4], including its complexity and how it is unfair to many American taxpayers and businesses. Additional columns will be posted as Congress continues to debate tax reform and you will be able to find those columns here on my website [link 5]. **FROM THE PHOTO ALBUM...** Included here are a few photos of people who have come by to visit in recent weeks and a few photos from my time at home. [image = crapo.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/Aziz_O_-_Beta_Club_-_7_11_1.jpg] *Senator Crapo is pictured with Aziz Ouedraogo (Boise), 2017 John W. Harris Leadership Award Winner through the National Beta Club.* * [image = crapo.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/Cassidy_Littleton_1.jpg]* *Senator Crapo is pictured with Cassidy Littleton (Twin Falls), a finalist for the National Boys and Girls Clubs Youth of the Year.* [image = crapo.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/East_ID_Public_Health_-_8_25_-_MIECHV_program_-_2.JPG] *Senator Crapo pictured with individuals at East Idaho Public Health.* * [image = crapo.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/Wake_Island_Event_8_23.jpg]* *Senator Crapo with family members of survivors of the December 1941 attack and imprisonment of Wake Island civilian Department of Defense employees. * *Alice Ingham, seated, has coordinated reunions in Idaho for survivors and families for 71 years, the last of which was held this September.* * [image = crapo.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/TF_Lincoln_Elementary_School_8_24.JPG]* *Senator Crapo reads "Whistle for Willie" to 4th grade students at Lincoln Elementary School in Twin Falls during a book donation courtesy of the Library of Congress surplus books program [link 6].* [image = crapo.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/CJ_Buck_Buck_Knives.jpg] *Senator Crapo is pictured with CJ Buck (Post Falls) of Buck Knives, Inc., and other members of the American Knife and Tool Institute.* **WHAT I HAVE BEEN READING . . .** *Western senators say fire-funding fix must be 'on the next bill' Congress passes [link 7]* *By Betsy Russell, Spokesman-Review, September 28, 2017* Western senators, led by Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo and Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden, are launching a full-court press to get a fix for the nation's wildfire funding system through Congress now, while the nation is still gasping from a record fire season and coping with disasters from Texas to Florida to Puerto Rico. *Congress can learn fiscal responsibility from Idaho [link 8]* *By Alejandra Cerna Rios, Post Register, October 4, 2017* In Idaho, responsible budgeting and fiscal prudence have served us well. Stable fiscal policies in recent years have generally supported economic growth and produced critical revenues post-recession. While additional investment is needed to fully fund a number of broadly shared priorities (such as education, healthcare, transportation and public defense), our state's finances have been predictable. By contrast, at least 30 other states are facing shortfalls and budget cuts. *Poll: Idahoans say North Korea is the greatest global threat [link 9]* *By Bob Bernick, Idaho Politics Weekly, September 24, 2017* A new Idaho Politics Weekly poll shows that Idahoans say North Korea poses the greatest threat to world peace today. The Dan Jones & Associates survey in Idaho finds: - 32 percent picked the pre-selected choice of North Korea as the greatest threat - which since GOP President Donald Trump's speech at the United Nations has engaged in renewed threats with the president. - 27 percent said ISIS, or ISIL, the Islamic terrorist organization now fighting in several areas of the world and Middle East. - 25 percent mentioned some "other" entity or person. - 5 percent said Russia. - 4 percent said Iran. - And 6 percent didn't know *The U.S. West had a snowy winter, so why the fiery summer? [link 10]* *By Dan Elliott, Idaho Statesman, September 8, 2017* Acrid yellow smoke clogs the skies of major Western U.S. cities, a human-caused fire in the Columbia River Gorge rains ash on Portland, Oregon, and a century-old backcountry chalet burns to the ground in Montana's Glacier National Park. Wildfires are chewing across dried-out Western forests and grassland, putting 2017 on track to be among the worst fire seasons in a decade. # # #
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Dropping In This Issue

  • Crapo Convenes Hearing on Equifax Data Breach
     
  • Crapo Leads Discussion with Agriculture Secretary to Fix Wildfire Funding
     
  • Sanctions on North Korea Reviewed in Banking Committee
     
  • Idaho U.S. Attorney Clears Senate Confirmation
     
  • Op-Ed Series: Tax Reform for all Americans
     
  • From the Photo Album
     
  • What I've Been Reading

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2017

The past several weeks have been busy in Washington, with hearings on critical issues including North Korea sanctions and oversight of the recent Equifax data breech.  In this edition of the Mike Drop, I highlight some of the work I have been involved with in recent weeks.  You are receiving this email because you may have signed up to receive communications from me via my website, or perhaps at one of my town meetings.  If you would like to keep receiving these periodic updates, you do not need to take any action.  If you would like to unsubscribe, you can do so using the links at the end of this message.  As always, you are welcome to email me through my website, crapo.senate.gov, under the 'contact me' tab at the top of the page. 

Dropping in this issue . . .

CRAPO CONVENES HEARING ON EQUIFAX DATA BREACH; INFORMATION FOR IDAHO CONSUMERS

Equifax, one of the country’s three largest credit reporting agencies, disclosed that more than 145 million people had their names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses, and in some cases driver’s license numbers compromised in a massive data breach.  As Chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, which has oversight of the credit bureaus, I called in former Equifax Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Richard Smith to get answers to some of our many questions, such as why it took Equifax six weeks to disclose the breach publicly, why executives were trading during that time, what kind of cybersecurity measures the company employs and how the company intends to minimize harm to consumers and make them whole.

You can watch the full hearing with Richard Smith by clicking on the image below.  The hearing begins at the 18:00 minute mark.

Sen. Crapo questions former Equifax CEO Richard Smith

Cybersecurity is one of the most pressing issues facing companies, consumers and governments alike, and is one of the biggest threats to our financial system.  The amount of data that the private industry and the government collect and store is very concerning.  Collecting such massive amounts of personal financial information creates an intrinsic vulnerability.  Congress will be having meaningful discussions about how to protect and limit access to it.

While those discussions are ongoing, Idahoans should take every precaution to secure their data and protect themselves in the wake of a breach.  First, you should find out if your information has been compromised by visiting the Equifax website.  If you have been affected, you can sign up for a fraud alert through Equifax.  Equifax has also announced free credit freezes through January, as well as a free lifetime service that will allow customers to lock and unlock their credit files.  I encourage you to explore these options to determine whether they are right for you, and continue to monitor your credit reports and bank accounts for any unusual activity in the meantime.

I also encourage you to take proactive steps toward protecting your privacy.  The Federal Trade Commission offers helpful tips on how to safeguard your personal information.  General advice includes knowing who you share information with; storing and disposing of your personal information securely, especially your Social Security number; asking questions before deciding to share your personal information; and maintaining appropriate security on your computers and other electronic devices.

In this digital age, it is almost virtually impossible to prevent entities from collecting and storing massive amounts of personal, private information.  We have seen that no one is immune when it comes to cyberattacks, and we all need to take the necessary steps to prioritize cybersecurity and resiliency.  Equifax is just the latest in a series of massive data breaches at major companies, demonstrating that more needs to be done to ensure customer information is protected.  Private and public entities must prioritize maintaining strong safeguards to protect any and all personally identifiable information of U.S. consumers.  Both must be held accountable for protecting and limiting access to that information.

CRAPO LEADS DISCUSSIONS WITH AGRICULTURE SECRETARY TO FIX WILDFIRE FUNDING

On September 26, I joined a bipartisan group of western senators in meeting with U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue to push legislation I am co-sponsoring with Senator Ron Wyden (D-Oregon) to fix a practice known as “fire borrowing." During the meeting, it was clear from both the Secretary and fire experts from the U.S. Forest Service that Congress should pass our bill to end fire borrowing. 

The bill, known as the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act, would treat wildfires as natural disasters and stop the depletion of the Forest Service’s budget by reforming the way the federal government funds wildfires. The legislation would end “fire borrowing” by allowing agencies to fund any fire fighting and suppression spending needed through disaster funding just as other agencies do for tornadoes, hurricanes and floods. It would also make room for wildfires in the disaster budget so other natural disasters would not have to “compete” for disaster funds. Making disaster funding available after the fire suppression funding is spent would allow the Forest Service to use its fire prevention funding for its intended purpose--completing hazardous fuels reduction projects that have been shown to help break the cycle of increasingly dangerous and costly fires. It would also prevent the Forest Service from exhausting its budget, which is needed for other projects such as forest restoration, habitat programs, trail maintenance and fire prevention programs, such as thinning.

During our breifing, the Forest Service announced all-time record spending of more than $2 billion to pay to fight this year’s wildfires, which have destroyed significant parts of the West. These fires have, once again, forced federal agencies to empty non-fire accounts of more than a half-billion dollars to pay for wildfires. More than 8.5 million acres have burned across the country this year--a 47 percent increase from the 10-year average of 5.8 million acres, according to the U.S. Forest Service. The emergency preparedness levels for fire are at the highest point in five years. 
 
We already know in the West about the devastation of these wildfires on our habitat, our lungs, and on our heritage. Hopefully, now our colleagues in the Senate will see the magnitude and immediacy of this problem and end this "fire borrowing" so that we can focus on fire prevention and saving lives, habitats and our favorite public lands for the future.
 
You can see my exhcnage with Secretary Perdue by clicking on the image below. 
 
 
Click the image for video of Sen. Crapo's exchange with Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue.
 
 
Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue (at podium), is joined by Sens. Crapo, Risch, Wyden (D-Oregon) and Bennet (D-Colorado)

NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REVIEW BEFORE COMMITTEE CHAIRED BY CRAPO

Many Idahoans have seen the recent news regarding North Korea’s aggressive pursuit of nuclear weapons. North Korea has continued to draw international rebuke for its firing a missile over Japan, and for conducting another test of a nuclear device, this one possibly being an atmospheric test of a type of hydrogen bomb. These actions only serve to suggest that if North Korea were to become a nuclear-armed state, it would present an existential threat to at least several of its Asian neighbors, while posing a great danger to American citizens. Our President has been working to stop further proliferation by increasing the economic pressure on those who do business with the North Korean regime.  One way to apply such pressure is through the use of sanctions. 

Several weeks ago, the committee heard from a panel of sanctions scholars and professionals who agreed that economic and diplomatic pressure must be maintained against North Korea.  In a more recent hearing before the Senate Banking Committee, we heard from Administration officials who spoke about the actions taken by the Administration to deploy maximum pressure against North Korea.  Our witnesses from the Treasury and State Departments discussed increased sanctions enforcement, as well as efforts to encourage multilateral enforcement of sanctions. The committee also assessed what additional sanctions, if any, the U.S. should impose in light of North Korea’s continued missile testing and advancing nuclear weapons capability.

The Banking Committee has received several pieces of legislation that would impose even stronger sanctions against North Korea and those who facilitate its pursuit of nuclear weapons. I am committed to working closely with my colleagues to carefully assess the options available to the Banking Committee to enhance pressure on North Korea. You can view the hearing in its entirety by clicking on the image below. Note that the video has quite a lengthy delay so to watch it, I recommend advancing the video to the 15 minute mark to begin.

IDAHO STATE SENATOR BART DAVIS CONFIRMED BY U.S. SENATE TO BE U.S. ATTORNEY FOR IDAHO

Recently, the nomination of Idaho State Senator Bart Davis to serve as Idaho’s next United States Attorney was confirmed by the full United States Senate.  As a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, which was responsible for overseeing this nomination, I worked with the rest of my Senate colleagues to move his nomination to the full Senate.  Bart Davis is a dedicated public servant who will ensure all Idahoans receive equal justice under the law.  I congratulate Senator Davis on his confirmation to be Idaho’s next United States Attorney.

Before his confirmation, Davis has represented the 33rd District in the Idaho State Senate for the past 19 years, including as Majority Leader for 15 years. In addition to his service in the Idaho State Senate, Senator Davis is currently in private practice in Idaho Falls, Idaho, where he focuses on commercial, regulatory and transactional work. He is currently a commissioner to the Uniform Law Commission and a past chairman of The Council of State Governments. He is a graduate of Brigham Young University and the University of Idaho College of Law.

IN CONGRESS NOW: TAX REFORM FOR ALL AMERICANS

The Senate and House, in conjunction with the President, have been discussing a framework to reform our outdated, overly-complex tax code.  It has been 30 years since the last major revision of our tax code.  Its complexity is hindering the ability of our economy to grow, small businesses to expand and thrive and, perhaps most importantly, American families to keep more of what they earn.  To do tax reform right, we must go beyond the simple traditional tax cut debate and instead comprehensively address each of these problems within the tax code.  Beginning in a series of opinion pieces this month, , including its complexity and how it is unfair to many American taxpayers and businesses.  Additional columns will be posted as Congress continues to debate tax reform and you will be able to find those columns .

FROM THE PHOTO ALBUM...

Included here are a few photos of people who have come by to visit in recent weeks and a few photos from my time at home.

 

Senator Crapo is pictured with Aziz Ouedraogo (Boise), 2017 John W. Harris Leadership Award Winner through the National Beta Club.

Senator Crapo is pictured with Cassidy Littleton (Twin Falls), a finalist for the National Boys and Girls Clubs Youth of the Year.

Senator Crapo pictured with individuals at East Idaho Public Health.

Senator Crapo with family members of survivors of the December 1941 attack and imprisonment of Wake Island civilian Department of Defense employees. 
Alice Ingham, seated, has coordinated reunions in Idaho for survivors and families for 71 years, the last of which was held this September.

Senator Crapo reads “Whistle for Willie” to 4th grade students at Lincoln Elementary School in Twin Falls during a book donation courtesy of the Library of Congress .

Senator Crapo is pictured with CJ Buck (Post Falls) of Buck Knives, Inc., and other members of the American Knife and Tool Institute.

WHAT I HAVE BEEN READING . . .

By Betsy Russell, Spokesman-Review, September 28, 2017
Western senators, led by Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo and Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden, are launching a full-court press to get a fix for the nation’s wildfire funding system through Congress now, while the nation is still gasping from a record fire season and coping with disasters from Texas to Florida to Puerto Rico.
 
By Alejandra Cerna Rios, Post Register, October 4, 2017
In Idaho, responsible budgeting and fiscal prudence have served us well. Stable fiscal policies in recent years have generally supported economic growth and produced critical revenues post-recession. While additional investment is needed to fully fund a number of broadly shared priorities (such as education, healthcare, transportation and public defense), our state’s finances have been predictable. By contrast, at least 30 other states are facing shortfalls and budget cuts.
 
By Bob Bernick, Idaho Politics Weekly, September 24, 2017
A new Idaho Politics Weekly poll shows that Idahoans say North Korea poses the greatest threat to world peace today.
The Dan Jones & Associates survey in Idaho finds:
  • 32 percent picked the pre-selected choice of North Korea as the greatest threat – which since GOP President Donald Trump’s speech at the United Nations has engaged in renewed threats with the president.
  • 27 percent said ISIS, or ISIL, the Islamic terrorist organization now fighting in several areas of the world and Middle East.
  • 25 percent mentioned some “other” entity or person.
  • 5 percent said Russia.
  • 4 percent said Iran.
  • And 6 percent didn’t know
By Dan Elliott, Idaho Statesman, September 8, 2017
Acrid yellow smoke clogs the skies of major Western U.S. cities, a human-caused fire in the Columbia River Gorge rains ash on Portland, Oregon, and a century-old backcountry chalet burns to the ground in Montana's Glacier National Park.  Wildfires are chewing across dried-out Western forests and grassland, putting 2017 on track to be among the worst fire seasons in a decade.

 

# # #

 

OFFICE LOCATIONS:

Washington, DC Office
239 Dirksen Senate Office Building | Washington, DC 20510
Phone: (202) 224-6142 | Fax: (202) 228-1375

Boise Office
251 E. Front St., Suite 205,
Boise ID, 83702
Phone: (208) 334-1776 |
Fax: (208) 334-9044
Coeur d'Alene Office
610 Hubbard, Suite 209,
Coeur d' Alene, ID 83814
Phone: (208) 664-5490 |
Fax: (208) 664-0889
Idaho Falls Office
410 Memorial Dr., Suite 204,
Idaho Falls, ID 83402
Phone: (208) 522-9779 |
Fax: (208) 529-8367
Lewiston Office
313 'D' St., Suite 105,
Lewiston, ID 83501
Phone: (208) 743-1492 |
Fax: (208) 743-6484
Pocatello Office
275 S. 5th Ave., Suite 225, Pocatello, ID 83201
Phone: (208) 236-6775 | Fax: (208) 236-6935
Twin Falls Office
202 Falls Ave., Suite 2, Twin Falls, ID 83301
Phone: (208) 734-2515 | Fax: (208) 733-0414

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