The Laudable Pursuit: The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act

Senator Mike Lee
2018-01-26 10:16:41
January 26, 2017 "to elevate the condition of men--to lift artificial weights from all shoulders, to clear the paths of laudable pursuit for all, to afford all an unfettered start and a fair chance, in the race of life." --Abraham Lincoln Chairman's Note: The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act At twenty weeks past conception a baby can sleep and wake in the womb. She can suck her thumb, make faces, and see light filtering in through the womb. And by 20 weeks, if not before, science suggests that baby can also feel pain. Only seven countries in the entire world allow elective abortions at this late stage. And the United States is one of them. Each year in this country, more than ten thousand abortions occur after the twenty-week mark. We can stop this and we must. That is why this coming Monday's vote on the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act is so important. The abortion lobby is attacking this bill by denying there is any evidence that unborn babies can feel pain at twenty weeks. That's what the abortion lobby says. But what does the science say? According to a 2006 study from the International Association for the Study of Pain, "The available scientific evidence makes it possible, even probable, that fetal pain perception occurs well before late gestation." The study goes on to say that pain perception develops in the "second trimester," "well before the third trimester." A 2012 study by the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists concludes, "the basis for pain perception appear[s] at about 20 to 22 weeks from conception." And another 2012 study that was published in the journal Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy found that ". . . from the second trimester onwards, the fetus reacts to painful stimuli . . . [T]hese painful interventions may cause long-term effects." The authors of this study recommend that unborn children be given painkillers during "potentially painful procedures" such as surgeries-or, I would add, such as abortions. There are many more studies like these but the consensus is clear: The science at a minimum suggests that unborn children can feel pain at 20 weeks . . . Can feel the abortionists' knife and suction tube as it rips them apart in the womb. That possibility alone should have us rushing to ban abortion at 20 weeks. A vote for that bill is a vote to protect some of the most vulnerable members of the human family. Together, we can move our country's laws away from North Korea and China, and towards our most fundamental belief: That all human beings are created equal and have an unalienable right to life. Sen. Lee Calls Earmarks the Definition of the 'Swamp' Click here to watch video Issue in Focus: One Weird Trick To End Government Shutdowns A few weeks ago, parents across the country bundled their kids up and sent them back to school after the holiday break. For some this meant loading them onto a bus that would drop their child off at a nearby private school, walking their child down the street to the local public school, driving them a town over to a charter school, or herding them down into the basement to resume home schooling. While each of these parents had chosen different ways to educate their children, what they all have in common is the desire for their child to succeed and receive the kind of education that will serve as a cornerstone for success in their lives. But all too often, parents who have the most skin in our country's education system get stifled in the federal red tape that surrounds their child's education. Millions of low-income families find themselves trapped in underperforming schools and are helpless to change their circumstances. Parents are torn at what stage to start investing in their child's education, because they can't afford to save for private school tuition and college while still giving them school supplies. Many parents feel like their attempts to give their child a better life come up fruitless. We can do better. But in order to do so, we have to acknowledge some truths about our education system. First, increased education funding is not a silver bullet. Since 1970, the federal government has nearly tripled the amount of money it spends on elementary and secondary education, with little improvement to show for it. Second, Not all schools will be a good fit for all students and parents are most often the best suited to make these decisions. And third, the federal regulations currently in place inhibit parents from choosing and investing in their children's education. This is why I introduced the Enhancing Educational Opportunities for all Students Act this week. This bill would allow parents back in to their child's education by giving them flexibility in how to finance it. This flexibility means schools that parents could otherwise not afford could now be an option. This bill would allow parents to use federal education Title I dollars as they saw fit. That could mean the public school in the child's neighborhood, another public school across town, or even a private school of the parent's choosing. The bill also removes the tax burden that comes when parents invest more than $2,000 a year in a child's Education Savings account. That means parents can save and build more resources that can then be spent on tuition, books, other school supplies, or even college. By empowering parents and giving them this flexibility, we are taking an important step to improve the future of this country. As Thomas Jefferson said, "Above all things, I hope the education of the common people will be attended to, [as] on their good sense we may rely with the most security for the preservation of a due degree of liberty." We can secure that liberty for tomorrow by giving it to parents today. Washington, D.C. Office 361A Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C., 20510 Phone: 202.224.5444 Fax: 202.228.1168 Salt Lake City Wallace F. Bennett Federal Building 125 South State, Suite 4225 Salt Lake City, UT 84138 Phone: 801.524.5933 Fax: 801.524.5730 St. George Office of Senator Michael S. Lee 285 West Tabernacle, Suite 200 St. George, UT 84770 Phone: 435.628.5514 SaveSaveSave SaveSave SaveSaveSave Save Save Save Save Save Save SaveSave SaveSaveSave SaveSave Save This message was intended for: xxx You were added to the system October 2, 2015. 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January 26, 2017

"to elevate the condition of men--to lift artificial weights from all shoulders, to clear the paths of laudable pursuit for all, to afford all an unfettered start and a fair chance, in the race of life." --Abraham Lincoln

Chairman's Note: The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act

At twenty weeks past conception a baby can sleep and wake in the womb. She can suck her thumb, make faces, and see light filtering in through the womb.
 
And by 20 weeks, if not before, science suggests that baby can also feel pain.
 
Only seven countries in the entire world allow elective abortions at this late stage. And the United States is one of them.
 
Each year in this country, more than ten thousand abortions occur after the twenty-week mark.
 
We can stop this and we must.
 
That is why this coming Monday’s vote on the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act is so important.
 
The abortion lobby is attacking this bill by denying there is any evidence that unborn babies can feel pain at twenty weeks.
 
That’s what the abortion lobby says. But what does the science say?
 
According to a 2006 study from the International Association for the Study of Pain, “The available scientific evidence makes it possible, even probable, that fetal pain perception occurs well before late gestation.”
 
The study goes on to say that pain perception develops in the “second trimester,” “well before the third trimester.”
 
A 2012 study by the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists concludes, “the basis for pain perception appear[s] at about 20 to 22 weeks from conception.”
 
And another 2012 study that was published in the journal Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy found that “. . . from the second trimester onwards, the fetus reacts to painful stimuli . . . [T]hese painful interventions may cause long-term effects.”
 
The authors of this study recommend that unborn children be given painkillers during “potentially painful procedures” such as surgeries—or, I would add, such as abortions.
 
There are many more studies like these but the consensus is clear: The science at a minimum suggests that unborn children can feel pain at 20 weeks . . . Can feel the abortionists’ knife and suction tube as it rips them apart in the womb.
 
That possibility alone should have us rushing to ban abortion at 20 weeks.
 
A vote for that bill is a vote to protect some of the most vulnerable members of the human family.
 
Together, we can move our country’s laws away from North Korea and China, and towards our most fundamental belief: That all human beings are created equal and have an unalienable right to life.

 

Sen. Lee Calls Earmarks the Definition of the 'Swamp'

Click here to watch video

 

Issue in Focus: One Weird Trick To End Government Shutdowns

A week ago, the government shuttered its doors. For roughly 68 hours, the men and women of our armed services did not know when they would receive their next paycheck.

When the government reopened, it was because Congress passed and the President signed a Continuing Resolution (CR) that allowed the government to be funded – but only for three weeks. And the CR passed this Monday was needed because the four-week CR before that ran out. And that CR was preceded by another CR that passed right before Christmas.

This of governing-by-cliff has unfortunately become the status quo in Washington. The fact is, Congress has not completed all twelve regular appropriations bills by the October 1st deadline since 1997, and between 1985 and 1997, this important budget marker has only been met twice.

Instead we’ve been governed by a quilt work of Continuing Resolutions, Omnibuses, and rushed budget agreements, many of which are held until the last minute so lawmakers are unable to read their contents in full. The result is instability and unpredictability not only in our government organizations, but also for the many families and businesses that interact with the federal government.

This is not a responsible way to govern. It’s bad for our military, it’s bad for our citizens, and it’s bad for our form of government.

Who it is good for is a small handful of people who are responsible for making these decisions. Every time one of these CRs pass, they gain a little more power for themselves.

This is why I have yet to vote for a CR during my seven years in Congress. We cannot change the system while constantly voting to support it. And more and more of my colleagues are coming to agree with me.

Just last week Sen. Rob Portman (R-PA) introduced the End Government Shutdowns Act. This bill would automatically keep discretionary programs, like our military, funded at their pre-deadline levels for 120 days, but then as every additional 90 days passes without a new appropriation bill, their funding drops by 1%. All discretionary spending is treated equally; no partisan carve-outs and no exceptions.

This strikes a necessary balance between incentivizing good budgeting habits while discouraging last-minute, haphazard stopgap funding measures. And it provides stability and predictability without allowing Congress to pat ourselves on the back for averting a self-made crisis.

 

Washington, D.C. Office
361A Russell Senate Office Building
Washington, D.C., 20510
Phone: 202.224.5444
Fax: 202.228.1168

Salt Lake City
Wallace F. Bennett Federal Building
125 South State, Suite 4225
Salt Lake City, UT 84138
Phone: 801.524.5933
Fax: 801.524.5730

St. George
Office of Senator Michael S. Lee
285 West Tabernacle, Suite 200
St. George, UT 84770
Phone: 435.628.5514




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