Update from Senator Bob Corker - February 12, 2018

Senator Bob Corker
2018-02-12 11:26:23
Bob Corker - U.S. Senator, Tennessee *More Than Discouraged by Irresponsible **Spend-Now-Pay-Later **Mentality in Congress* On Thursday, Senator Corker announced his opposition to the massive spending agreement reached by congressional leaders. "This agreement increases the discretionary spending caps by nearly $300 billion over the next two years, perpetuates the abuse of OCO, and tees up another spending battle two years from now," *said Corker*. "It is also only partially offset, and most of those offsets occur years from now, doubling down on the irresponsible mentality in Congress of spend-now-pay-later. To say I am discouraged by the outcome of these negotiations would be an understatement." Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) is intended to provide emergency funding for military missions overseas but has been repeatedly abused to fund normal operations at the Departments of Defense and State in order to avoid exceeding statutory spending caps. *Tennessean Paul Ney **Nominated to Serve as General Counsel for the Department of Defense* On Thursday, Senator Corker introduced Tennessean Paul C. Ney Jr. at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on his nomination to serve as general counsel of the Department of Defense. "I am pleased to be here with you to introduce Paul Ney, who has been nominated to serve as general counsel for the Department of Defense," *said Corker*. "Paul has worked for the state of Tennessee ably and well for many years, currently serving as the chief deputy attorney general. For two years, he was director of Nashville Mayor's Office of Economic and Community Development... During the Bush administration, he served as acting general counsel for the Navy, where he led 600 Navy lawyers stationed all around the world. From there, he became deputy general counsel for the Department of Defense, where he advised senior defense officials on constitutional law issues, litigation, detainee policy, and other weighty matters." "When people who have worked closely with Paul describe him, they use words like 'respected', 'warm', 'well-liked'," *concluded Corker*. "For someone who is as accomplished and capable as he is, Paul is surprisingly humble. He has a great respect for the permanent civil service and uniformed personnel, and he strives to help them succeed. I wholeheartedly support his nomination, and thank the committee for holding this hearing, and encourage my colleagues to support his confirmation." [image = corker.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/020818-JK2-170.jpg] [link 1] **Click here [link 2] or on the image above to watch the senator's remarks.** *Ensuring Music Creators in Tennessee Are Compensated for Their Work* On Wednesday, Senator Corker joined four of his Senate colleagues to introduce the Compensating Legacy Artists for their Songs, Service, & Important Contributions to Society Act, or CLASSICS Act. The bipartisan legislation would ensure that recording artists from the pre-1972 music eras are fairly compensated when their music is played digitally. For historical reasons, sound recordings made before February 15, 1972 are governed by state law rather than federal law. In recent years, this has led to disputes as to the scope of state law rights when sound recordings are performed by digital music services. The CLASSICS Act would correct that oddity by bringing those pre-1972 sound recordings into the federal system, thus allowing the artists and owners of such recordings to be fairly compensated when their music is digitally transmitted. "Tennessee is blessed with a vibrant music industry composed of talented songwriters, skilled musicians, and gifted recording artists," *said Corker. *"However, while the industry has been transformed with advances in technology, we have yet to modernize the way music creators are compensated for their work. It is nonsensical that today some of our legendary performers may not get paid for the hits they recorded before 1972, and this legislation will provide certainty for those artists." Last month, Corker joined seven of his Senate colleagues to introduce [link 3] the Music Modernization Act. The bipartisan legislation would be the most significant change in music licensing laws in decades to ensure songwriters are paid fair value for their songs. The Music Modernization Act would set up a new simplified licensing entity to make it easier for digital music companies to obtain a license and play songs. The entity will also ensure songwriters are paid the royalties they are owed. Click here [link 4] to learn more about the CLASSICS Act. *Tyson Foods to Pass on Tax Reform Savings to More Than 5,000 Tennessee Employees* On Wednesday, Tyson Foods announced it will use its savings from tax reform to provide one-time bonuses to employees, improve advancement opportunities, and accelerate capital projects. The company employs 5,000 Tennesseans and last year announced it would create 1,500 new jobs and invest $300 million in Humboldt. [image = corker.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/Capture_4.PNG] [link 5] *Welcoming Tennesseans to Washington* Last week, Senators Corker and Alexander hosted more than 50 Tennesseans at "Tennessee Tuesday," a regular breakfast held on Capitol Hill every week the Senate is in session for visitors from the Volunteer State. For more information, click here [link 6]. [image = corker.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/IMG_8982.JPG] [image = corker.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/IMG_9003.JPG] Last week, Senator Corker met with members of the Tennessee Association of Utility Districts to discuss their work to serve over 500 utilities and businesses across the Volunteer State. [image = corker.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/IMG_9028.JPG] [image = corker.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/IMG_9020.JPG] *Working to Reform the Peace Corps and Better Protect Its Volunteers* On Wednesday, Senator Corker, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, praised committee passage of legislation to reform the Peace Corps. The Nick Castle Peace Corps Reform Act of 2018 [link 7] would improve access to medical care for volunteers, strengthen accountability and oversight, and enhance procedures to reduce the risk of crime in the countries in which volunteers serve. The legislation was authored by Corker and is named in honor of Nick Castle, of Brentwood, Calif., who lost his life at age 23 due to inadequate health care while serving in China in 2013. It was later determined by the inspector general that flaws in medical care and the response to his illness contributed to his death. "Very simple steps would have saved Nick's life," said Sue and David Castle, the parents of Nick Castle*. "As parents, we have worked for legislation to ensure this never happens to another family, and we believe this legislation will make the changes that are needed. Nick wanted to make a difference in this world, but he didn't have time to do that. We hope with the passing of this legislation that he can make a true lasting impact on the Peace Corps." "I am always inspired by young people, like Nick Castle, who dedicate themselves to making a difference early in life," *said Corker. *"Nick exemplified the extraordinary commitment of Peace Corps volunteers who devote 2-3 years in service to our country. They deserve the very best support we can provide. Our bill will expand oversight and accountability at the Peace Corps while improving the care our volunteers receive overseas and for service-related injuries when they return home. As this bill advances to the full Senate, I am encouraged by the strong bipartisan support for our efforts to strengthen the Peace Corps and honor Nick Castle's memory." Click here [link 8] to learn more about the Nick Castle Peace Corps Reform Act of 2018.

More Than Discouraged by Irresponsible Spend-Now-Pay-Later Mentality in Congress

On Thursday, Senator Corker announced his opposition to the massive spending agreement reached by congressional leaders.

“This agreement increases the discretionary spending caps by nearly $300 billion over the next two years, perpetuates the abuse of OCO, and tees up another spending battle two years from now,” said Corker. “It is also only partially offset, and most of those offsets occur years from now, doubling down on the irresponsible mentality in Congress of spend-now-pay-later. To say I am discouraged by the outcome of these negotiations would be an understatement.”

Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) is intended to provide emergency funding for military missions overseas but has been repeatedly abused to fund normal operations at the Departments of Defense and State in order to avoid exceeding statutory spending caps.

Tennessean Paul Ney Nominated to Serve as General Counsel for the Department of Defense

On Thursday, Senator Corker introduced Tennessean Paul C. Ney Jr. at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on his nomination to serve as general counsel of the Department of Defense. 

“I am pleased to be here with you to introduce Paul Ney, who has been nominated to serve as general counsel for the Department of Defense,” said Corker. “Paul has worked for the state of Tennessee ably and well for many years, currently serving as the chief deputy attorney general. For two years, he was director of Nashville Mayor’s Office of Economic and Community Development... During the Bush administration, he served as acting general counsel for the Navy, where he led 600 Navy lawyers stationed all around the world. From there, he became deputy general counsel for the Department of Defense, where he advised senior defense officials on constitutional law issues, litigation, detainee policy, and other weighty matters.

When people who have worked closely with Paul describe him, they use words like ‘respected’, ‘warm’, ‘well-liked’,” concluded Corker“For someone who is as accomplished and capable as he is, Paul is surprisingly humble. He has a great respect for the permanent civil service and uniformed personnel, and he strives to help them succeed. I wholeheartedly support his nomination, and thank the committee for holding this hearing, and encourage my colleagues to support his confirmation.

Click

Ensuring Music Creators in Tennessee Are Compensated for Their Work

On Wednesday, Senator Corker joined four of his Senate colleagues to introduce the Compensating Legacy Artists for their Songs, Service, & Important Contributions to Society Act, or CLASSICS Act. The bipartisan legislation would ensure that recording artists from the pre-1972 music eras are fairly compensated when their music is played digitally.

For historical reasons, sound recordings made before February 15, 1972 are governed by state law rather than federal law. In recent years, this has led to disputes as to the scope of state law rights when sound recordings are performed by digital music services. The CLASSICS Act would correct that oddity by bringing those pre-1972 sound recordings into the federal system, thus allowing the artists and owners of such recordings to be fairly compensated when their music is digitally transmitted. 

“Tennessee is blessed with a vibrant music industry composed of talented songwriters, skilled musicians, and gifted recording artists,” said Corker. “However, while the industry has been transformed with advances in technology, we have yet to modernize the way music creators are compensated for their work. It is nonsensical that today some of our legendary performers may not get paid for the hits they recorded before 1972, and this legislation will provide certainty for those artists.”

Last month, Corker joined seven of his Senate colleagues to introduce the Music Modernization Act. The bipartisan legislation would be the most significant change in music licensing laws in decades to ensure songwriters are paid fair value for their songs. The Music Modernization Act would set up a new simplified licensing entity to make it easier for digital music companies to obtain a license and play songs. The entity will also ensure songwriters are paid the royalties they are owed. 

Click

Tyson Foods to Pass on Tax Reform Savings to More Than 5,000 Tennessee Employees

On Wednesday, Tyson Foods announced it will use its savings from tax reform to provide one-time bonuses to employees, improve advancement opportunities, and accelerate capital projects. The company employs 5,000 Tennesseans and last year announced it would create 1,500 new jobs and invest $300 million in Humboldt.

Welcoming Tennesseans to Washington

Last week, Senators Corker and Alexander hosted more than 50 Tennesseans at “Tennessee Tuesday,” a regular breakfast held on Capitol Hill every week the Senate is in session for visitors from the Volunteer State. For more information, click here.

Last week, Senator Corker met with members of the Tennessee Association of Utility Districts to discuss their work to serve over 500 utilities and businesses across the Volunteer State. 

Working to Reform the Peace Corps and Better Protect Its Volunteers

On Wednesday, Senator Corker, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, praised committee passage of legislation to reform the Peace Corps. The  would improve access to medical care for volunteers, strengthen accountability and oversight, and enhance procedures to reduce the risk of crime in the countries in which volunteers serve. The legislation was authored by Corker and is named in honor of Nick Castle, of Brentwood, Calif., who lost his life at age 23 due to inadequate health care while serving in China in 2013. It was later determined by the inspector general that flaws in medical care and the response to his illness contributed to his death.

“Very simple steps would have saved Nick’s life, said Sue and David Castle, the parents of Nick Castle. “As parents, we have worked for legislation to ensure this never happens to another family, and we believe this legislation will make the changes that are needed. Nick wanted to make a difference in this world, but he didn't have time to do that. We hope with the passing of this legislation that he can make a true lasting impact on the Peace Corps.”

“I am always inspired by young people, like Nick Castle, who dedicate themselves to making a difference early in life,” said Corker. “Nick exemplified the extraordinary commitment of Peace Corps volunteers who devote 2-3 years in service to our country. They deserve the very best support we can provide. Our bill will expand oversight and accountability at the Peace Corps while improving the care our volunteers receive overseas and for service-related injuries when they return home. As this bill advances to the full Senate, I am encouraged by the strong bipartisan support for our efforts to strengthen the Peace Corps and honor Nick Castle’s memory.”

Click