instaPoll: Should the United States government have the ability to use a drone to take the life of a U.S. citizen located in a foreign country who is a “senior operational leader of al-Qa’ida or an associated force” without due process of law?

Office of Congressman J. Randy Forbes
2013-03-15 18:39:14
Last month, a memo was leaked outlining the White House Administration’s policy of targeted killings of U.S. citizens overseas. Since that time, questions have been raised about the constitutionality of the policy and whether it could also be used against a U.S. citizen here in America. According to the memo, where the target is a U.S. citizen who is a “senior operational leader of al-Qa’ida or an associated force” and is located in a foreign country outside the area of active hostilities, lethal force would be lawful if: An informed, high-level official of the U.S. government has determined that the targeted individual poses an imminent threat of violent attack against the United States; Capture is infeasible, and the United States continues to monitor whether capture becomes feasible; and The operation would be conducted in a manner consistent with applicable law of war principles. The guarantee of due process is affirmed twice in the United States Constitution: The Fifth Amendment states that “No person shall be…deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law,” and the Fourteenth Amendment further states that “Nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.” Attorney General Eric Holder stated that due process “does not require judicial approval before the President may use force abroad against a senior operational leader of a foreign terrorist organization with which the United States is at war – even if that individual happens to be a U.S. citizen.” Others, like Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) warned against not only the targeting of American citizens without first providing due process, but doing so on American soil. Senior Members of the House Judiciary Committee sent a letter to President Obama requesting that the Committee be granted the opportunity to review all documents pertaining to the legal justification of drone strikes on Americans abroad. The administration released these memos to the House and Senate Intelligence Committees; however, it refused to provide them to the House Judiciary Committee, which is charged with oversight of the Justice Department and the U.S. Constitution. Question of the week: Should the United States government have the ability to use a drone to take the life of a U.S. citizen located in a foreign country who is a “senior operational leader of al-Qa’ida or an associated force” without due process of law? ( ) Yes. ( ) No. ( ) I don’t know. ( ) Other. Take the Poll here. Find the results of last week’s InstaPoll here. Home | Contact | Unsubscribe | Privacy | Office Locations Please do not reply to this message. This email address does not accept incoming messages. To send an email, click here. Trouble viewing this email? See it in your web browser: forbes.house.gov/news/email/show.aspx

 

 

Last month, a
According to the memo, where the target is a U.S. citizen who is a “senior operational leader of al-Qa’ida or an associated force” and is located in a foreign country outside the area of active hostilities, lethal force would be lawful if:

  • An informed, high-level official of the U.S. government has determined that the targeted individual poses an imminent threat of violent attack against the United States;
  • Capture is infeasible, and the United States continues to monitor whether capture becomes feasible; and
  • The operation would be conducted in a manner consistent with applicable law of war principles.

The guarantee of due process is affirmed twice in the United States Constitution: The Fifth Amendment states that “No person shall be…deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law,” and the Fourteenth Amendment further states that “Nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.”

Attorney General Eric Holder

Question of the week:

( ) Yes.
( ) No.
( ) I don’t know.
( ) Other.


Take the Poll

Find the results of last week’s InstaPoll

 

Home | ContactUnsubscribePrivacy | Office Locations
Please do not reply to this message. This email address does not accept incoming messages. To send an email, click here.
Trouble viewing this email? See it in your web browser: http://forbes.house.gov/news/email/show.aspx?ID=Y4ENTNYI4PBUBB2PJV3KX5W6MM