Marching on

Sen. Mary Landrieu
2013-08-28 15:06:48
    28   Aug 13   Marching on Dear Friend, Today, we mark the 50-year Anniversary of the March on Washington to bring equality and freedom to all people. It was a day when thousands of people stood up and took action for what was right-despite the immense challenges. Leading that effort and standing atop the reflecting pool on the National Mall, Dr. King gave the more than 200,000 people there-and our entire nation-the faith and courage they needed to work peacefully toward greater justice, equality and freedom. Take a virtual tour of the 1963 March on Washington.  The March helped expose the injustices many people of color in our country faced and built support for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. While our country is better today than it was then, our work is still not done. We must continue to work toward ending racism and discrimination in our country and against the economic injustices of disproportionally high unemployment and poverty in minority communities. And we must ensure that every legally authorized citizen can freely exercise their right to vote. Sadly, last year's election showed all too well that this remains a stubborn challenge for our country to overcome. We are called today to not just remember the March on Washington, but to join it. We must march on and continue Dr. King's work so that his dream-that all Americans are judged by the content of their character, not by the color of their skin-and that the founding principles of this country-that all are created equal-becomes a reality. I'm committed to continuing Dr. King's call and marching on to carry out that work until his dream is reality in Louisiana and across our country. All the best,   Please contact Sen. Landrieu at the office nearest you.   www.landrieu.senate.gov  |  unsubscribe  
 
Mary Landrieu | Senator for Louisiana
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28
 
Aug 13
 

Marching on


Dear Friend,

Today, we mark the 50-year Anniversary of the March on Washington to bring equality and freedom to all people. It was a day when thousands of people stood up and took action for what was right-despite the immense challenges.

Leading that effort and standing atop the reflecting pool on the National Mall, Dr. King gave the more than 200,000 people there-and our entire nation-the faith and courage they needed to work peacefully toward greater justice, equality and freedom. Take a virtual tour of the 1963 March on Washington. 

The March helped expose the injustices many people of color in our country faced and built support for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. While our country is better today than it was then, our work is still not done.

We must continue to work toward ending racism and discrimination in our country and against the economic injustices of disproportionally high unemployment and poverty in minority communities. And we must ensure that every legally authorized citizen can freely exercise their right to vote. Sadly, last year's election showed all too well that this remains a stubborn challenge for our country to overcome.

We are called today to not just remember the March on Washington, but to join it. We must march on and continue Dr. King's work so that his dream-that all Americans are judged by the content of their character, not by the color of their skin-and that the founding principles of this country-that all are created equal-becomes a reality.

I'm committed to continuing Dr. King's call and marching on to carry out that work until his dream is reality in Louisiana and across our country.

"

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All the best,

 


Please contact Sen. Landrieu at .
 
www.landrieu.senate.gov  |  unsubscribe