A Bad Deal and a Bad Precedent

Senator Mike Lee
2015-09-16 12:57:35
US Senator for Utah, Mike Lee [image = lee.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/eCard-header-sunset-silhouette.jpg] * "Let's Talk" Join my Upcoming Teletownhall* Please do join my next live, interactive Vekeo event on Wednesday, Sept. 16 at 4:30 p.m. MT. [image = lee.enews.senate.gov//images/user_images/Teletownhall square.png] Last month I traveled across the state of Utah to hold a series of discussions with Utahns. I joined roundtables on how we can work together to reduce poverty and improve our criminal justice system. I visited several companies and their employees. I am always amazed by the innovation and opportunity created by Utah�s dynamic free enterprise system. And I was impressed by 250 high school students whose questions and comments renewed my hope in America�s future. I also held several town hall meetings where we discussed topics ranging from the president�s deal with Iran, taxpayer funding for Planned Parenthood, how to fix our broken immigration system, and how to reduce federal debt and spending. I am looking forward to continuing this dialogue in my next telephone townhall, on Wednesday at 4:30 p.m. MT. You can sign up to be part of this event or participate online in the livestream here. [link 1] * A Bad Deal and a Bad Precedent* Recently, Senate Democrats blocked the Senate from voting on the ?president's deal? with Iran, but had we been allowed to vote on the deal, I would have proudly voted against it. The agreement struck by the Obama administration and the leaders of the Islamic Republic of Iran is a bad deal for global security, a bad deal for our allies and a bad deal for the American people. And that's why, without the support of the American people or the consent of their elected representatives in Congress, this deal is nothing more than a political agreement between President Obama and the leaders of Iran. When Secretary Kerry testified before the House of Representatives in August, Congressman Reid Ribble, R-Wis., asked him why the Obama administration did not consider the Iran deal to be a treaty. This was Secretary Kerry's response: "Well Congressman, I spent quite a few years trying to get a lot of treaties through the United States Senate, and frankly, it's become physically impossible. That's why. Because you can't pass a treaty anymore." This is indefensible. Secretary Kerry's appeal to expedience shows either an ignorance of � or a disdain for � both principle and precedent. The Senate has not lost the ability to ratify treaties. No, the Senate is perfectly capable of ratifying treaties, as it did 160 times during the George W. Bush administration. It's just reluctant to ratify unpopular treaties that undermine U.S. interests. I agree with Alexander Hamilton when he said, "The history of human conduct does not warrant that exalted opinion of human virtue which would make it wise in a nation to commit interests of so delicate and momentous a kind, as those which concern its intercourse with the rest of the world, to the sole disposal of [the] President of the United States." I also believe that now is the time to make clear � to the White House and to the American people � that the Senate understands, and plans to defend, its rightful role in the treaty-making process. Read my speech I delivered in opposition to the Iran deal here [link 2] [image = lee.enews.senate.gov/common/images/sn-facebook.png]Share on Facebook [link 3] [image = lee.enews.senate.gov/common/images/sn-twitter.png]Share on Twitter [link 4]
September 16, 2015

"Let's Talk" Join my Upcoming Teletownhall

Please do join my next live, interactive Vekeo event on Wednesday, Sept. 16 at 4:30 p.m. MT.

Last month I traveled across the state of Utah to hold a series of discussions with Utahns. I joined roundtables on how we can work together to reduce poverty and improve our criminal justice system. I visited several companies and their employees. I am always amazed by the innovation and opportunity created by Utah�s dynamic free enterprise system. And I was impressed by 250 high school students whose questions and comments renewed my hope in America�s future. I also held several town hall meetings where we discussed topics ranging from the president�s deal with Iran, taxpayer funding for Planned Parenthood, how to fix our broken immigration system, and how to reduce federal debt and spending. I am looking forward to continuing this dialogue in my next telephone townhall, on Wednesday at 4:30 p.m. MT.

A Bad Deal and a Bad Precedent

Recently, Senate Democrats blocked the Senate from voting on the ?president's deal? with Iran, but had we been allowed to vote on the deal, I would have proudly voted against it.

The agreement struck by the Obama administration and the leaders of the Islamic Republic of Iran is a bad deal for global security, a bad deal for our allies and a bad deal for the American people. And that's why, without the support of the American people or the consent of their elected representatives in Congress, this deal is nothing more than a political agreement between President Obama and the leaders of Iran.

When Secretary Kerry testified before the House of Representatives in August, Congressman Reid Ribble, R-Wis., asked him why the Obama administration did not consider the Iran deal to be a treaty.

This was Secretary Kerry's response: "Well Congressman, I spent quite a few years trying to get a lot of treaties through the United States Senate, and frankly, it's become physically impossible. That's why. Because you can't pass a treaty anymore."
This is indefensible.

Secretary Kerry's appeal to expedience shows either an ignorance of � or a disdain for � both principle and precedent.
The Senate has not lost the ability to ratify treaties. No, the Senate is perfectly capable of ratifying treaties, as it did 160 times during the George W. Bush administration. It's just reluctant to ratify unpopular treaties that undermine U.S. interests.

I agree with Alexander Hamilton when he said, "The history of human conduct does not warrant that exalted opinion of human virtue which would make it wise in a nation to commit interests of so delicate and momentous a kind, as those which concern its intercourse with the rest of the world, to the sole disposal of [the] President of the United States."

I also believe that now is the time to make clear � to the White House and to the American people � that the Senate understands, and plans to defend, its rightful role in the treaty-making process.

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